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NAMES: Rev. Robert JACKSON; Abigail BUCKLEY née JACKSON also CROFTON; Richard MANSERGH; John OVEREND; Samuel PEPLOE; Rodger REMMINGTON; Isaac LETOUSSEY; John PHILIPSON. PLACES: Tatham, Lancashire.
Sharon Oddie Brown. March 21, 2016.

1733 Jan 21 probate Rev Robert JACKSON[1]

 

NOTE: This probate was done with a typeset form with blanks that were filled in by hand. I have only done notes of the pertinent parts. The rest is the usual legal rote of the sort that can be found in such forms. Thanks to Jan Waugh for teasing out a few of the more daunting words. The inventory is fascinating – quite a window into the life lived by the Rev. Robert JACKSON..

 

 

Know all men by these presents that we Abigail Buckley[2] of Tatham in the County of Lancaster widow Richard Mansergh[3] of Tathan aforesaid Gentleman and John Overend[4] of the said Tatham yeoman are holden and firmly bound unto the Reverend Father in God Samuel[5] by Divine permission  Lord Bishop of Chester  in the sum of Three Thousand pounds …. Sealed with our Seals and dated the Twenty-first day of January… one thousand seven hundred thirty and three.

 

The Condition of this Obligation is such that if the abovementioned Abigail Buckley Administratrix of all and Singular the Goods and Chattles and Credits of her late brother Robert Jackson of Tatham in the County of Lancaster Clerk deceased… into the Registry of the Archdeaconry of Richmond at or before the twenty first day of April next ensuing….

 

Sealed and delivered in the Presence of

 

RogRemington[6]

Isaac Le[?]ousey[7]

Abigail Buckley

Richd Mansergh

John Overend

 

January 14, 1733/4 an [appr(a)isem(en)t

Made of the Goods and Chattles of the

Revd Robert Jackson late Doctor of Tatham

Deceased

 

[Inpts]

 

Purse and Apparel

117.0.0

29 Pewter Dishes

4.7.0

41 pewter plates

1.10.0

11 brass pots and pans

5.10.0

Iron ware

3.0.0

Earthen ware

2.0.0

China ware

00.10.0

Plate

31.10.0

Glasses

00.10.00

In the Hall

05.0.0

In the Parlour

12.0.0

In the Kitchen

06.0.0

In the Brewhouse

07.0.0

In ye blew roome

07.0.0

In ye midle (or white?) roome

04.0.0

In ye servants two rooms

04.0.0

In ye Garrots

07.0.0

In ye Aple roome

05.0.0

In ye Stable

00.5.0

Beans in ye Hay Barn

06.0.0

In ye [Tyth?] Barn

12.10.0

In ye  Row Rodding House Oats

21.0.0

In ye  Row Redding Barn

12.0.0

In ye   barn at Thornton

06.0.0

In Burton Tyth Barn

27.0.0

In ye   barn at Newton

03.0.0

In ye   House at Kirkby Lonsdale

05.0.0

In ye   House at Clifford

00.10.0

Husbandry gear

06.0.0

Meal Malt

03.0.0

Beef & Bacon

01.0.0

43 sheep

10.0.0

18 Horses

50.0.0

6 [herlie?]

04.0.0

In ye   Study

09.0.0

Knives and Forks

00.10.0

ffowles

00.10.0

Sacks

01.0.0

Boos

01.0.0

Wheat

01.10.0

Rye

01.10.0

Table Linen

05.0.0

ffeathers

00.10.0

Bottles

00.10.0

6 Oxen

26.0.0

A Bull & a segg

07.0.0

6 steers

16.0.0

2 Heifers

5.10.0

9 Cows

27.0.0

4 Calves

5.0.0

2 Oxon

17.0.0

14 [Y?]earlng Stocks

22.0.0

Moneys upon specialty

814.0.0

Approved by us

Rogr Rommington[8]

Jno Philipson[9]

Ricd Mansergh

 

To ffuneral Expenses __________ 112.10.0

To Moneys payable or Bills & Bonds _____ 289.0.0



[1] Robert JACKSON (abt 1690 -1733) For wuite some time, his parentage was a mystery. Now I am 90% sure that he was a son of Nathaniel JACKSON (1640-1696) and Elizabeth WOODS of Leeds.

·       The lands that Robert inherited in Ireland as well as in Kirkby Lonsdale, placed him as a nephew of Samuel JACKSON (1641-1706). He succeeded Samuel JACKSON’s brother, Rev Leonard JACKSON (abt 1650-1726), as rector of Tatham. The notes done of the will of Samuel JACKSON (1641-1706) by TGF Patterson finally made this clear.

[2] Abigail BUCKLEY née JACKSON (1683-1763) was a sister of Rev. Robert JACKSON. Her 1st marriage was to a widower of considerable means. In her 2nd marriage, she married a man who was not only 27 years her junior, but half her age (and then she lived to be 80 years old).

·       She married firstly a William BUCKLEY Esq. in 1718, in a marriage performed by her uncle Rev. Leonard JACKSON.  SOURCE: Marriages at the Church of St James the Less in the Parish of Tatham NOTE: William BUCKLEY Esq. was a widower, and likely came into Wennington Hall after the death of his 1st wife, Mary, the widow of Charles MARSDEN of Wennington Hall, Lancashire. SOURCE: The History of the Parish of St. Michael’s-on-Wyre. There are some impressive photos of Wennington Hall, a class II building now used as a school: Wennington School and Wiki Wennington Hall.

·       She married Sir Oliver CROFTON on December 6, 1737. He had multiple “bastard” children born while Abigail was alive, and then named Ellinore PIERCE as his wife. NOTE: It is unlikely that they actually married. SOURCE: Crofton Memoirs, An account of JOHN CROFTON, Of Ballymurry, Co. Roscommon Queen Elizabeth's Escheator-General of ASD OF His Ancestors and Descendants, and others Bearing the Name. York 1911. Compiled by Henry Thomas Crofton, assisted by Rev. William Ball Wright and Helen Augusta Crofton. NOTE: The Rev. William Ball WRIGHT who assisted in the preparation of these memoirs was also hired by Amy LLOYD née JACKSON (1874-1941) to prove some aspects of her mother’s ancestry. Then he went and drowned himself in a the river Ouze.

o   See also Nick Reddan’s newspaper abstracts for CROFTON news.

o   Sir Oliver was born in 1710, and died on November 9, 1780. On December 6, 1737, when he was 27 years old, he married, at St. Audoen's Church in Dublin, a widow, Mrs. Abigail Jackson Buckley, who was just double his age, viz., 54, and there was no issue of the marriage. She was possessed of much property in Ireland, and also in the Counties of Lancaster, York, and Westmorland, in England. Sir Oliver administered to her estate on February 4, 1767: Crofton Memoirs, An account of JOHN CROFTON, Of Ballymurry p.128

o   Pue's Occurrences record that on August 18, 1742, "at Limerick the trial began of Oliver Crofton, Esq., for the killing of John Massey, of Duntrv League, Esq., in a duel, as also of Thomas Cooke, Esq., his second. The prosecution was carried on against them both by the relatives of the deceased. The trial lasted near five hours, when, to the general satisfaction, they were honourably acquitted." NOTE: The Rev. William Ball WRIGHT who assisted in the preparation of these memoirs was also hired by Amy LLOYD née JACKSON to prove some aspects of her mother’s ancestry. Crofton Memoirs, An account of JOHN CROFTON, Of Ballymurry p.128

o   There is a Miniature of a young Crofton woman painted in a miniature at the National Gallery of Ireland. Since it does not resemble the mother of Sir Oliver CROFTON, it may be Abigail JACKSON. Crofton Memoirs, An account of JOHN CROFTON, Of Ballymurry p.128

o   The lands of Ballinclea, or the Town of the Mountain, were first mentioned in the time of the Commonwealth. They were then forfeited lands, and had belonged to the owner of Loughlinstown, James Goodman, who had mortgaged them to his cousin, Roland Goodman. The tithes were paid to the Cathedral of Christ Church, as they had, no doubt, been in mediaeval times to the Priory of the Holy Trinity. After the restoration of the lands, on which the two houses and a population of nine Irish, were granted amongst much other property, to the Duke of York, afterwards James II, and remained in his possession until his abdication. Some years after that event, in 1703, there were put up for auction by the trustees of the forfeited estates, and sold to Mr Samuel Jackson. They subsequently became the property of Sir Oliver Crofton, Bart, whose baronetcy, conferred on an ancestor after the restoration, became extinct on his death. Crofton was a rollicking blade, and did not bear the most immaculate character. In early life he had stood his trial for killing a man, one of the Massys of Duntrileague, in a duel, and his proceedings, after the death of his predecessor in the title, had not been to his credit. Attempts were made from time to time to induce people to build on the excellent sites which the lands of Ballinclea afforded, and finally Crofton came to live there himself. Loftus, whose lands adjoined, found Crofton a most unpleasant neighbour, and, on his boundary wall being thrown down by Crofton and his servants, sought, in 1765, the protection of the House of Commons. The house found that a breach of privilege and been committed, and some of Crofton’s servants, who had insulted Loftus, were taken into custody. SOURCE: A History of the County of Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the earliest times to the close of the Eighteenth Century.  Vol 1 Francis Erlington Ball. Dublin, 1902. NOTE: This fracas happened after Abigail JACKSON’s death.

o   Deeds evidence mentions both marriages: ROD: 120-79-81900. Indentured deed btw Sir Oliver CROFTON of the City of Dublin Bart & Dame Abigail CROFTON otherwise Buckley otherwise JACKSON his wife. & Jane JACKSON of the City of Dublin spinster of the other part. Thomas COCKS of Mt Cashell in the County of Clare Gent of the other part imparting that the said Sir Oliver CROFTEN Abigail his wife, and  Jane JACKSON in pursuance of a minitt or article therein mentioned have been made theretofore made by Samuel JACKSON deceased to John BETSON deceased and in consid of the rents & agreements… demised to said Thomas COCKS the town and land of Knightstown otherwise Kingstown containing therin mentioned 121a 3r 2p in Parish of Lusk Barony of Nethercross & Co of Dublin for 31 years . NOTE:  Samuel JACKSON (1641-1706) was her uncle. Lusk is now in the Barony of Balrothery East.

[3] Richard MANSERGH. There are few clues that may help to ascertain who he was:

·       A Richard MANSERGH, son of Johannis MANSERGH was baptized at Whittington Aug 20 1685.

·       A Richard MANSERGH was buried at Whittington on March 27, 1757.

·       Burkes shows a connection of the MANSERGHs to the ST. JOHNs of Leitrim.

·       The Richard MANSERGE of Whittington near Hornby was described as a yeoman.

·       Manserge Hall became part of the Underley Estate.

·       SOURCE:  A Verbatim Report of the Cause Doe Dem. Tatham V. Wright:

[4] John OVEREND

[5] Samuel PEPLOE (1667-1752)

[6] [Rodger?] REMMINGTON

[7] Isaac LETOUSEY

[8] The script in this document makes it look different from the signature of Roger REMINGTON who witnessed the will, so it may be that this a Regd REMINGTER. Best to keep an open mind.

[9] John PHILIPSON

 

 

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