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NAMES: High Sherriff of Monaghan - Francis LUCAS; Andrew OLIVER; David OLIVER of Ballyrea; Ho. George SHIRLEY; Archibald DOBBIN; John RODEN [?] of Glasslough; Thomas VERNER; John CUMING; Robert JOHNSTON; Thomas TENESON (or is it TERESON?).
Sharon Oddie Brown. July 1, 2009

 

1775 Jan 25

DEED 316-107-210086

 

THINKING OUT LOUD

NOTE:  I am also posting these thoughts as a separate document under History/OLIVER. The transcription of the annotated deed follows this "Thinking out Loud" piece. I will likely remove it from here in the future.

 

I am trying to make sense of this indenture. What we have in this document is the sheriff seizing goods from David OLIVER in 1775 (likely for unpaid rent) as well as a recitation of a lease five years earlier dated January 6, 1770 which had been granted for a term of 21 years from George SHIRLEY to Andrew OLIVER, not to David OLIVER. Hmm. What is the financial and therefore also likely familial relationship between these two men?

 

From other deeds, we know that David OLIVER already held leases in 1765 to two townlands Laragh and Cornacarrow which are both just north of the townland of Creevy. By 1770, David OLIVER was presumably already chasing refinancing. On April 26, 1770, he let 100 acres on the west side of the townland of Laragh, Co. Monaghan as well as some water rights for ₤63 rent/year for 26 years to a Joseph OLIVER, who I presume was his brother.  SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1770Apr26-OLIVER-OLIVER.html 

 

On July 30, 1770, David OLIVER also let his interests in Laragh & Cornacarrow and also 8 acres at Creevy to Arthur OLIVER for £346.3.8. SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1770July30-OLIVER-OLIVER-Laragh.html Who was Arthur OLIVER – since he lived at Ballinahonebeg, he has to be related to this lot, but at present I don’t know how.

 

Thanks to an email 2009 Jan 22 from Mary Kerly, I know that in 1779 a John OLIVER was paying £30 per annum for Creevy Mill[1]. He was probably too young at age 15 to be the John OLIVER (1764-abt1798) who was the son of the aforementioned Joseph OLIVER (1727-abt1795) & Jane OATES (1727-bef1798), both of Ballinahonebeg, Co. Armagh. Is he another son of Andrew?

 

So, lets back up a bit. When did the OLIVERs arrive and when were they gone? Again, thanks to Mary Kerly, I know that their names did not surface as one of the principal farmers in Creevy in the 1663 records. There is a locally known story[2] that the OLIVERs were said to be descendants of Cromwellian settlers, but this is a version that I have never been able to substantiate (not that it might not turn out to be true). Our family version is that the OLIVER family members were Huguenots. When they arrived is anyone’s guess, but at least it seems that they did not root at Creevy prior to 1663.

 

In spite of several OLIVER deeds showing OLIVER interests in the linen industry in Monaghan, there were only 5 OLIVERs in Monaghan recorded as Irish Flax Growers in 1796:

 

Surname

First Name

Parish/Barony

County

Oliver

James

Magheross[3]

Monaghan

Oliver

Mary

Magheracloone

Monaghan

Oliver

James

Clontibret[4]

Monaghan

Oliver

David

Ematris[5]

Monaghan

Oliver

Robert[6]

Magheross

Monaghan

Oliver

William[7]

Ematris

Monaghan

 

 

Again, to lean on the work done by Mary Kerly:

 

In the PRONI (Belfast) Records of the Shirley Estate there are numerous books of rentals for the 1800's recording townland, tenants, acreage and rental payment. The following is some information I have recorded from these books

 

1824 Rentals Creeves (sic) (Ref. D/3531/R/3/1, Page 140) had four different divisions (Creeves Crawley, Creeves Rooney, Creeves Swinburn & Creeves Mill Holdings). Benjamin Oliver is listed as the tenant of Creeves Mill Holdings and the holding consisted of 13acres 1rood 13perches.  In the Tithe Applotments of Donaghmoyne Parish (1824) the townlands are listed in the same fashion with the spelling of "Creeves" as "Creevy" and Benjamin Oliver as the tenant (acreage is not given only amount Tithes payable).

 

Given this, it is curious that a Brian OLIVER is recorded in a local document about Creevy[8]. I suspect this may be a conflation of two names and that it should actually be Benjamin OLIVER. Brian is a first name that I have not seen in that era in combination with the surname OLIVER.

 

By the time of Griffiths Valuation in 1861, Robert OLIVER is the OLIVER person of record at Creevy, although there are still plenty of other OLIVERs in nearby townlands. He is shown leasing house and lands at Creevy with a valuation of £3.10.0 from Rt. Hon Edward LUCAS. The house is valued only at £0.10.0. It is more likely that he lived at Shanco, Parish of Magheross where he leased a house valued at £15.10.0 on 22 acres from Evelyn P. SHIRLEY. Regardless, the heyday of the OLIVERs at Creevy was clearly over.

 

At the time of Griffiths, a Joseph OLIVER still held corn and flax mills at nearby Reduff valued at £3.0.0 but he more likely lived at Drumillard in a house leased from William HUGHES and valued at £12.15.0. Both townlands are in the Parish of Agnamullen. What pricks my curiosity here is that Thomas OLIVER (1741-1826) who married Margaret McCLELLAND (1750-1827) was born in Aughnamullen, Co. Monaghan of an unknown OLIVER (but my hunch would be the Andrew OLIVER who married Elinor DAWSON). This Thomas OLIVER has no son named Joseph, so we are still back at square one here.

 

GRIFFITHS VALUATIONS

For a more complete version, SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/maps/Monaghan-Griffiths-OLIVER.html

Surname

First Name

Townland

Parish

County

Oliver

Benjamin

Kilcrow

Clontibret

Monaghan

Oliver

Elizabeth

Cordressigo

Ematris

Monaghan

Oliver

James

Drumgurra

Magheross

Monaghan

Oliver

James

Lisnafeddaly

Magheross

Monaghan

Oliver

James

Mullaghcroghery

Magheross

Monaghan

Oliver

Joseph

Drumillard

Aghnamullen

Monaghan

Oliver

Joseph

Faulkland

Donagh

Monaghan

Oliver

Joseph

Reduff

Aghnamullen

Monaghan

Oliver

Robert

Creeve

Clontibret

Monaghan

Oliver

Robert

Mullaghcroghery

Magheross

Monaghan

Oliver

Robert

Shanco

Magheross

Monaghan

Oliver

Robert

Shanco

Magheross

Monaghan

Oliver

Robert

Tanmacnally

Ematris

Monaghan

Oliver

William

Crossaghy

Clontibret

Monaghan

Oliver

William

Darraghlan

Kilmore

Monaghan

 

 

To the register appointed by Act of Parliament for registering Deeds etc, A Memorial of an Indentured Deed bearing date the twenty fifth day of January one thousand seven hundred & seventy five made between the then [?] High Sherriff of Co. Monaghan of 1st part & Andrew OLIVER[9] in Co. Armagh of other part. Whereby after reciting that certain writ of Fieri Facia[10]s therein mentioned had issued to the said Sherriff against the goods and chattels of David OLIVER[11] of Ballyrea[12], Co. Armagh and by virtue thereof the said Sherriff had taken and issued in Execution all the Defendant’s right Title and Interest to and of the Certain form of land consisting of eighteen Irish acres with a Corn Mill being thereon part of the lands of Creevey[13] Situate Lying and Being in the Barony of Farney and said County of Monaghan held by Certain Lease for twenty one years bearing date the sixth January one thousand seven hundred and seventy under the Honourable George SHIRLEY[14] at a Certain yearly rent & fees in said lease and thereon particularly mentioned he the said Sherriff by Virtue of a said writ of Fieri Facias and in consideration of one hundred and sixty pounds Sterling to him paid by the said Andrew OLIVER did Grant Bargain Sell Sign and Make over unto the said Andrew OLIVER his Executors Admons and Assigns all the said Deponent’s right Claim & Interest to and of the said Form of Land with the Corn Mill & all the appurtenances thereunto belonging or in any wise by force and Virtue of the therein recited Lease together with all the said recited Lease to have and to hold the said recited Farm & mill with all the appurtenances as thereunto being unto him the said Andrew OLIVER  his heirs Executors or Assigns and during the all the [?] of the Form year  of years then to come and unexpired in Said executed Lease which deed is witnessed by Archibald DOBBIN[15] of the town of Monaghan Innkeeper and John [R]ODON[16], Town of Gla[s?]lough[17], Gent both of the County of Monaghan and Thomas VERNER[18] is witnessed by Archibald DOBBINS & John CUMING[19] [?] The above named Archibald DOBBIN maketh oath that he is a subscribing witness at the deed of which the above is a Memorial & Saw the Same duly Executed by Robert JOHNSTON[20]  under Sherriff to the above named Francis LUCAS[21] the then late High Sherriff of the County Monaghan and as also subscribing witness to this Memorial and Saw the Same duly Executed by the above names Andrew OLIVER and that the name Archibald DOBBIN is this Deponants proper name & handwriting. Sworn before me at Monaghan the Seventh day of August 1776 [?] [?]outer Thomas TENESON[22]; Archibald DOBBIN.

 



[1] A list was attached to an Agent’s letter to the Landlord (Shirley) Ref D/3531/A/4

[2] Donaghmoyne Bulletin No 8207, 14 Feb 1982

[3] The townland of Shanco is in Magheross and is where a Robert OLIVER held leases in Griffiths. Also the townlands of Drumgurra, Lisnafeddaly, Mullaghcroghery were leased in Griffiths by a James OLIVER. I suspect the OLIVERs of the Flax & Griffiths records will turn out to be related.

[4] When I look at the townlands in the Parish of Clontibret, I see none that are directly related to OLIVERs, but Cordevlish does leap out as one that was tied into the linen industry and also to various other family members.

[5] It is possible that this townland in the Parish of Ematris which was connected to David OLIVER was either Tanmacnally or Cordressigo. A Robert OLIVER and an Elizabeth OLIVER show up as the respective lessees of these townlands in the Parish of Ematris in Griffiths. Elizabeth held a lease of 9 acres from Lord Cremorne and the house was valued at £0.10.0; Robert leased in common with three others (CLARKE, CONNOLLY, CONNOR) five lots that were all less than an acre in size and contained two structures valued at £0.15.0.

[6] Robert OLIVER held leases recorded in Griffiths in the townland of Shanco , Parish of Magheross.

[7] It is possible that the William OLIVER (abt 1730-1816) who was the brother of David OLIVER, but there are probably also other candidates.

[8] Donaghmoyne Bulletin No 8207, 14 Feb 1982

[9] Andrew OLIVER. I am leaving an open mind on who he might be. My best guess is a brother of the William OLIVER who was the father of David OLIVER.

[10] Fieri Facias - A seizure order exercised by a sheriff to enforce a judgment. Commonly abbreviated to fi.fa and still used as a legal today.

[11] David OLIVER (1725-1806), wife Susannah WALKER. They had six children.

[12] Ballyrea, Parish of Armagh, Co. Armagh. Several generations of OLIVERs resided here.

[13] Creevey, There is a townland called Creevey (Oliver) which is in the Parish of Donaghmoyne, Barony of Farney, Co. Monaghan. This is my earliest known OLIVER connection to it. It is just slightly south of the townlands of Laragh and Cornacarrow where David OLIVER set up mills in 1766.

[14] Honourable George SHIRLEY. He was born on 23 October 1705 and was the son of Robert SHIRLEY and Selina FINCH.  He married Mary STURT, daughter of Humphry STUART, on 28 December 1749. He died on 22 October 1787 at age 81. He lived at Ettington, Warwickshire, England (the family were absentee landlords for the most part). SOURCE: http://thepeerage.com/p28328.htm  An excellent bit of background on the family is at : http://www.shirleyassociation.com/NewShirleySite/NonMembers/Ireland/loughfea.html  PRONI D3531 is a huge repository of Shirley archives. The introduction can be seen at: http://www.proni.gov.uk/introduction__shirley_papers_d3531.pdf

[15] Archibald DOBBIN. I find it interesting that he was an innkeeper since the Andrew OLIVER who married Elinor DAWSON was also an innkeeper.

[16] John [R]ODON. There are RODEN connections to the LESLIEs – but I don’t know much about it.

[17] Gla[s?]lough aka Glasslough, CO. Monaghan an road 185, near the Leslie Estates. The description from Lewis Topographical Dictionsary gives the best picture: GLASSLOUGH, a post-town, in the parish of DONAGH, barony of TROUGH, county of MONAGHAN, and province of ULSTER, 5 miles (N. E.) from Monaghan, and 70 3/4 (N. W.) from Dublin; containing 812 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Monaghan to Caledon, on the margin of a beautiful lake, whence the town derives its name, signifying "the green lake." It has a striking and attractive appearance, and contains excellent slated houses. It is favourably situated with regard to commerce and agriculture, but until a very late period had little or no trade. In consequence of the judicious modes which have been adopted by the present owner, Mrs. Leslie, its capabilities have been developed and it has shown decided symptoms of rapid improvement. It has now a weekly market for wheat and flax, and a fair on the third Friday in every month for cattle, sheep, pigs, and other agricultural produce. An extensive flour-mill has been lately built in the neighbourhood, for which an ample supply of wheat is obtained from Glasslough market; and mills are now being built for scutching and spinning flax, also a factory on a large scale for weaving linens by hand and power looms; the whole, when completed, will afford permanent employment to between eight and nine hundred individuals. The beautiful and extensive park and castle of Mrs. Leslie, which adjoins the town and contains upwards of 1000 acres of fine land well planted, adds much to the natural beauty of the situation. The mansion was originally of considerable grandeur, but in consequence of repeated alterations has lost all its antique features. The ancient castle was situated opposite to the town gate of the present house, and was a building of considerable strength, flanked with circular towers and defended by a moat and drawbridge, possessing also those indispensable requisites of feudal power, a keep and donjon. The site had been a place of strength long before its erection, and was granted to O'Bear McKenna by O'Nial of Ulster, on the conditions that he and his descendants should pay "Bonaghty," or tribute, and furnish white meat and oats to the Gallow-glasses of O'Nial on certain days when they visited the holy well of Tubber Phadrick, near Glennan, and never to wage war with the O'Nials. This tribute was paid at stated periods in a house built of wood and osiers, at Anaghroe, or the "Red River," now the seat of William Murdoch, Esq. Near the town is the hill and rath of Drumbanagher, where, on the 13th of March, 1688, a battle was fought between a detachment of the Irish army, on its way to join the besiegers of Londonderry, and the native Protestant forces of the district, in which the latter gained a complete victory, but with the loss of their gallant colonel, Matthew Anketell, to whose memory a monument was erected in the parish church, which is still preserved. In the town is the parish church, with a tower 130 feet high: it has nothing in architectural beauty to attract notice; the interior arrangements are plain, neat, and commodious. During the erection of the tower a workman fell from the top, but escaped without suffering any material injury.

[18] Thomas VERNER. One of the local landlords.

[19] John CUMING. A name that keeps coming up in reference to the OLIVERs and the linen trade.

[20] Robert JOHNSTON 

[21] Francis LUCAS, late High Sherriff of Monaghan

[22] Thomas TENESON

 

 

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