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This is part of Deed of October 31, 2009
Sharon Oddie Brown. July 28, 2009

 

1900 October 31 CHART

 

NOTE: I have not fully annotated the townland names in this document. They can be seen in the original deed that this chart was a part of.

 

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Carnbeg

1 & 1A

Tenant’s Name: Samuel BRADFORD[1], as Devisee under the will of Thomas BRADFORD, deceased

Gale Days:  1st May and 1st November

Yearly Rent: £168.0.0

Quantity of Land: 129.1.37

NOTE: The Tenement Valuation of this Lot is £182.

Date and Description of Instrument (if any) under which tenant holds, and the tenure of each tenant:

By virtue of proposal, dated 9th November, 1898, and accepted by the Land Judge, the said Samuel BRADFORD is in occupation of these lands, held by him as devisee of Thomas BRADFORD[2], deceased, under lease of 25th of August, 1868, and by said proposal he is to pay the temporarily abated yearly rent of £168, until the sale in this matter, or further order of the court, over and above all rates and taxes, save income tax and half poor rates. This tenancy will be determined by the sale. The tenant will be entitled to his emblements (if any), or to such right of entry incident thereto, or to such alternative right of remaining in possession to the end of his tenancy, as is provided by the 34th section of the Landlord and Tenant Law Amendment, Ireland, act, 1860. The purchaser will not be entitled to any portion of the rent of £160.

Rights of Common, or of cutting turf, rights of way and other easements admitted to exist:

The lands will be sold subject to such rights-of-way and other easements affecting same as shall legally exist at the time of sale.

By reason of straightening the boundaries of the area of 1A includes 0 a. 1 r. 20 p. of Carnbeg not in the owner's possession, but he is in possession of 0 a. 1 r. 10 p. of the townland of Lisdoo not included in this estate. The changes are shown by the red and blue boundary lines. The conveyance will be in accordance with the boundary as edged in red but possession will be given in accordance with the boundary as edged blue.

The great Northern Railway intersects these lands. The land occupied by said Railway Company is excluded from this estate.

Sportsman’s Hall

1

1a

Moorland

1

Balriggan

1

Tenant’s Name: Samuel BRADFORD, as Devisee under the will of Thomas BRADFORD, deceased

Gale Days 1st May and 1st November

Yearly Rent: £126.5.11

Quantity of Land: 102.1.23

NOTE: The Tenement valuation of this Lot is £148.5.0.

Date and Description of Instrument (if any) under which tenant holds, and the tenure of each tenant:

By virtue of a proposal, dated 9th day of November, 1898, and accepted by the Land Judge, the said Samuel BRADFORD is in occupation of these lands, held by him as devisee of Thomas BRADFORD, deceased, who was tenant from year to year of said lands, at the yearly rent of £210; by said proposal the said Samuel BRADFORD is to pay in respect of these lands (and 9a. 2r. 16 p., other portion of Sportsman's Hall not in the tenancy for sale in this matter) the temporarily reduced early rent of £138 over and above all rates and taxes, save income tax in half poor rates.

This tenancy will be determined by the sale. The tenant will be entitled to his emblements (if any) or to such right of entry as is incident thereto, or to such alternative right of remaining in possession to the end of his tenancy, as is provided by the 34th section of the Landlord and Tenant Law Amendment (Ireland) Act, 1860. The purchaser will not be entitled to any portion of the rent of £126.05.11 payable by Mr. BRADFORD in respect of the lands for sale.

Rights of Common, or of cutting turf, rights of way and other easements admitted to exist:

The lands will be sold subject to such rights-of-way and other easements affecting same as shall legally exist at the time of sale. The great Northern Railway intersects these lands; the land occupied by said Railway Company is excluded from this estate.

Cavananore (part of)

1a

Tenant’s Name: Samuel BRADFORD, as Devisee under the will of Thomas

Gale Days: 1st May and 1st November

Yearly Rent:  £35.0.0

Quantity of Land: 47.3.20

NOTE: The Tenant Valuation of this Lost is £39

Date and Description of Instrument (if any) under which tenant holds, and the tenure of each tenant:

By proposal dated 9th of November, 1898, and accepted by ruling of the Land Judge, the said Samuel BRADFORD proposed to continue in the occupation of these lands, therein stated to contain 30 acres, Irish plantation measure, or thereabouts, formerly held by him as devisee of Thomas BRADFORD, deceased, and until a sale in this matter, or further order, he undertook to pay the temporarily abated yearly rent of £35, over and above all rates and taxes, save income tax and landlord's portion of poor rates.

The tenancy will be determined by the sale. The tenant will be entitled to his emblements (if any), or to such right of entry as is incident thereto, or to such alternative right of remaining in possession to the end of his tenancy as is provided by the 34th section of the Landlord and Tenant Law Amendment, Ireland, Act, 1860. The purchaser would not be entitled to any portion of the rent of £35.

Rights of Common, or of cutting turf, rights of way and other easements admitted to exist:

The lands will be sold subject to such rights-of-way and other easements affecting same as shall legally exist at the time of sale.

Ballynahattin (part of)

1

1a

2

Tenant’s Name: Tenants of Arthur O’HARE[3], deceased

Gale Days : 1st May and 1st November

Yearly Rent: £65.6.0

Quantity of Land: 101.0.19

NOTE: The Tenement Valuation of this Lot is £103.

Date and Description of Instrument (if any) under which tenant holds, and the tenure of each tenant:

Lease dated 11th November, 1781, from the Right Honorable James Earl of Clanbrassil[4] to Arthur O'Hare for 999 years, from 1st May, 1781, subject to the yearly rent of £81.05.6 of the then currency, over and above all taxes, subsidies, and impositions whatsoever, imposed or to be imposed (quit and Crown rent only excepted). Said lease contains the usual covenants for distress and re-entry in case of non-payment of said rent, and covenants by the said Arthur O'Hare, his executors, administrators and assigns, to grind all his or their corn and grain as therein at the mill of Dundalk or at the mill of Balriggan as therein, and to pay the usual toll or mulcture thereof, or in default to pay to the said James, Earl of Clanbrassil, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, the sum of five shillings for every barrel ground at any other mill or mills, and to keep the said premises in repair, and covenant by the said James, Earl of Clanbrassil, for quiet enjoyment. The rent reserved by the said lease is £81.05.6 late currency, but the tenants only pay the reduced rent stated in rent column, a portion of the demised premises having been taken by the great Northern Railway Co.

Rights of Common, or of cutting turf, rights of way and other easements admitted to exist:

The lands will be sold subject to such rights-of-way and other easements affecting same as shall legally exist at the time of sale.

The great Northern Railway intersects these lands, and the land occupied by said Railway Company is excluded from this estate.

Dowdall’s Hill

1

Tenant’s Name:  In possession of the Owner, Samuel BRADFORD.

Gale Days: 1st May and 1st November

Yearly Rent: £186.0.0

Quantity of Land: 172.1.20

Date and Description of Instrument (if any) under which tenant holds, and the tenure of each tenant:

Previous to the purchase of the fee of these lands the said Samuel BRADFORD held the same under lease, dated 6th March, 1878, made to him by the Earl of Roden for 31 years from first November, 1877, at the yearly rent of £350.

By proposal, dated 9th day of November 1898, and accepted by ruling of the Land Judge, the said Samuel BRADFORD proposed to continue in the tenancy of these lands, which he had held under said lease, at the temporarily abated rent of £186, until the sale in this matter or further order, over and above all rates and taxes, save income tax and half poor rates. This tenancy will be determined by the sale.

The tenant under this proposal will be entitled to his emblements (if any), or to such right of entry as is incident thereto, or to such alternative right of remaining in possession to the end of his tenancy, as is provided by the 34th section of the Landlord and Tenant Law Amendment, Ireland, Act, 1860.

In addition to the tenancy of the said Samuel BRADFORD under said proposal, the lands are subject to, and will be sold subject to, the following lease, viz.: - lease dated 30 December 1893 from Samuel BRADFORD, therein called the lessor, to Henry C. BACKHOUSE[5], Robert L. BROWN[6], Thomas J. BYRNE[7], Thomas CALLAN[8], Paul V. CAROLAN[9], Vincent T. CARROLL[10], James CONNOLLY[11], Michael HAGARTY[12], Joseph D. JENNINGS[13], Michael P. LYNCH[14], Thomas C. McARDLE[15], Charles McMAHON[16], H.F. McCANN[17], Michael C. MOYNAGH[18], James MURPHY[19], Henry O'CONNELL[20], John D. O'NEILL[21], William M. PATTESON[22], William TEMPEST[23], and Thomas WILLIAMSON[24], then stewards of the Dundalk race meeting, therein after called the lessees, whereby the said lessor granted and demised unto the said lessees, their executors, administrators and assigns, all that flat and steeplechase course, and flat course, with paddock in enclosures and approaches thereto at Dowdall’s Hill, as described on the map annexed thereto, together with the right of way and entry upon the said course and paddocks down by the road passing the buildings shown on said a map and the right of using all the gates and approaches thereto, and making such additional entries as might be found necessary, and with all the rights and privileges necessary to the enjoyment of said course by said lessees, or the steward or stewards for the time being of said race meeting, on the days and times therein mentioned; to hold for 99 years from first January, 1893, at the yearly rent of £70, payable half yearly on first April and first October, with liberty to the lessees to determine that tenancy at the end of every third year from the commencement of the said term and liberty to lessees to sublet said race course for agriculture shows or otherwise, and if said premises not sublet, or lessees did not hold any shows themselves during any one year or years, the rent payable to be £50 a year, with power for lessees to dispose of their interest under said lease to any private or public company, in that case allotting to lessor, if the capital of said company was fixed at £1000, £100 worth of fully paid up ordinary shares in such private or public company, free of charge, and if said capital be more than £1000, such allotment to be increased proportionately, and if lessees so disposed of their interest in said racecourse the lessor should receive an increase of rent and £10 every year. The said lease contains the proviso that the lessees should be allowed to have race meetings at any suitable time, and of any duration in time the said lessees might select each year, between the 13th day of August and the 20th day of June in any year inclusive, and on any days and at any time of each year of said term for a horse, agricultural, or other show, and that one calendar month's notice, in writing, of the day or days of such race meeting or show shall be given to the lessor as therein. And it was thereby agreed on the part of the lessor that the grass and the premises shown upon the said map, coloured pink, was to be kept short at the period of each meeting, and at no time to be grazed upon by any horses, cattle, or other beast, excepting sheep; the lessees to be at liberty to make necessary fences, etc., and lessor not to interfere with same; liberty to let part of ground defined on map for erection of tents, etc., lessor not to erect any tents without sanction of lessees; lessor to give lessees the use and occupation of all stables in buildings on the course, cleared of all cattle, etc., for 14 days before and seven days after every race meeting or horse show, free of charge; lessor not to plough said Steeplechase track or flat course or any part thereof, but to leave a clear space of grass not less than 100 feet wide, throughout its entire length and lessor not to plough or break up any part of the fields, containing about 9 acres and 14 a. 3 r. 10 p. respectively which fields are always to remain in grass; lessees not to be accountable for any injury to fences which might be committed by the general public attending race meetings or shows on any part of the premises on said racecourse; lessor not to permit horses to gallop on said course or to be trained over the fences, and should preserve all bushes, palings, etc., used in their protection; liberty to lessees to enclose all the farm of the lessor coloured pink, blue, green, and pale pink on said map, or any part thereof, as shown by the red line A., B., C., D., E. and F. on said map, with a good fence to be erected thereon by the lessees at own expense, and that any such parts so enclosed was not to be ploughed up; liberty to lessees to alter or add to the steeplechase tracks in a different position from those present on the map, and lessees have liberty to mow said racing and steeplechase tracks as shown on the map, and enclosures attached to said stand, if necessary, at any time before any race meeting or horse show; lessees to have rights to require lessor to remove all stock grazing on said lands two days before any race meeting or horse show; lessees during said term to hold the said demise premises in trust for the said lessees respectively, and such persons as should from time to time be appointed stewards of the said race meeting.

Rights of Common, or of cutting turf, rights of way and other easements admitted to exist:

The lands will be sold subject to such rights-of-way and other easements affecting same it shall legally exist at the time of sale.

 



[1] Samuel BRADFORD (b. Btw 1836-1840 – died 1915 in Janeville, Dunleer, Co. Louth). According to Bassetts 1886, he was a magistrate, a J.P. and a landowner who lived at Carnbeg. He was the son of Thomas BRADFORD & Margaret WALLACE. He married Sarah Louisa WILSON and they had two known children. For a more information on some of his land dealings, SEE: Events involving Samuel BRADFORD and Cavananore.

[2] Thomas BRADFORD (1800-1872) of Carnbeg. He married Margaret WALLACE and they had 12 children. OTHER NOTES: Anglo-Celt July 5, he was chair of a meeting allegedly attended by 10,000 to 15,000 people.  In January and February of 1851 and in March 1852, Thomas BRADFORD received threatening notices. SOURCE: “A RETURN of the number of Murders, Waylayings, Assaults, Threatening Notices, Incendiary Fires, or other Crimes of an Agrarian Character, reported by the Constabulary within the Counties of Louth, Armagh, and Monaghan, since the 1st day of January 1849; distinguishing by Name the Persons Murdered and Waylaid; also stating the Numbers Arrested for each Offense; whether Informations have been Sworn in the Case, and the Result of any Trial of the same” 1865 July 20 Belfast Newsletter: After some exciting speeches had been made, the crowd in the Court soon mixed with the rabble on the street, and in a short time several persons known to be friendly to Mr. M'Clintock were savagely maltreated.  Amongst the number was Mr. Thomas Bradford, Carnbeg, whose grey hairs should have protected him from violence, who was dragged off his car and brutally assailed by ruffians armed with huge bludgeons.  The unfortunate gentleman, whose only crime was that he was a staunch supporter of the Conservative candidate, was abused in a frightful manner, and at present lies in a very precarious condition. And also 1865 September 12: A very disgraceful outrage was perpetrated last week upon the lands of Mr. Thomas Bradford, of Carnbeg, near Dundalk, some of his lambs having been maliciously slaughtered.  Mr. Bradford, who was so ferociously beaten in the public streets of Dundalk at the last election, has only recovered, and this renewed attack on the part of the enemies of law and order is disgraceful.

SEE ALSO: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/documents/1856May14-McCULLAGH-WALLACE.html

[2] John Wallace BRADFORD (1851

[3] Arthur O’HARE. NOTE: By the time of Griffiths Valuations, Rev. Owen O’HARE owned most of the land not owned by the railway.

[4] Right Honourable James Earl of Clanbrassil. This would have been  James HAMILTON who died without issue in 1798.

[5] Henry C. BACKHOUSE Wine Merchant and grocer (1835-1919) married a Jane BACKHOUSE. In 1870, he served as a member of the Select Vestry of St. Nicholas Church . He subscribed £125 to help purchase the Glebe house and lands. He also wrote a lengthy article about the race course. Tempests Jubilee Annual 1909  (p 31& 40). He served on all sorts of boards. A description of his father and his roles in the family business after his father’s death is interesting: Mr. Henry Backhouse, a descendant of an old Quaker family who having first graduated in the famous tea house of Falkner of Grafton Street, Dublin, purchased the tea and grocery business of Mr. George Shekleton, who emigrated to Australia m 1845. Mr. Backhouse greatly extended his trade by establishing a soap and candle manufactory (an Irish industry now almost practically extinct) and also erected extensive excise bonded stores in Market Street. He afterwards took into partnership two of his employees—Messrs. Thomas Connolly and Henry Hale—and the business under this united management largely extended, necessitating the complete re-erection of the present fine premises, the addition of the adjoining houses, where a chemists and druggists trade was also added. Mr. Backhouse died in 1888, and was succeeded by his son, Henry Church Backhouse, who by his enterprise in establishing the first mineral water factory, and forming the business into a limited liability company, has greatly added to its prosperity, largely extending it, and giving much employment. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee Annual 1909  p81. In terms of family connections, it is interesting that the birth name of Doris Mary Marguarite BRANDT (wife of James Francis WRIGHT) was BACKHOUSE and her father as named on her marriage certificate was James Herbert BACKHOUSE. Merchant, and one of the witnesses was Alma E. BACKHOUSE. There may be a Dundalk connection to the Hong Kong BACKHOUSEs.

[6] Robert Louden BROWN was the son of Mr. Stephen Brown, Merchant and Millowner, of Philipstown, and Mill Street, was a most enterprising merchant. The extensive mills in Seatown, built by the Messrs. Dewhurst, were owned by him; and he also bought the immense model mills.of Philipstown, built by Mr. James Kieran at an expense of £30,000. These latter were unfortunately entirely burned to the ground in Oct, 1868, and Mr. Brown died in fourteen days afterwards. Mr. Brown, in addition to the coal trade, was an extensive grain exporter and importer, and embarked also in the weaving and spinning industry. He was married to a daughter of the late Mr. James Gilmore; and his four sons, Messrs. Thomas, Robert Louden, Stephen James, and Paul A., occupy prominent positions in the mercantile and legal professions. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[7] Thomas J. BYRNE

[8] Thomas CALLAN was the son of Mr. Peter CALLAN, of Park Street, a skilled and expert house painter and decorator, and one of the most intelligent and independent men of his craft. He had a wonderful memory, going back for the last 80 years, and his descriptions of " Old Dundalk were always interesting. He was a member of the Dundalk Band which played at O'Connell's great meeting at Tara, on the 15th August, 1843, at which nearly three quarters of a million people were present. His family and ancestors were connected with the "Upper End " for centuries. He died in 1908. His son, Mr. Thomas Callan, of Park Street, succeeds a worthy father and upright citizen. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[9] Paul V. CAROLAN was the son of Mr. Nicholas CAROLAN, an enterprising and energetic business man, in 1853 acquired the premises Earl Street from Mr. James Carroll, and started in them an extensive wine and spirit and grocery business. When Mr. Carolan commenced business, the principal trade was confined to a few of the good old fashioned houses ; but by an extensive system of advertising combined with great tact and integrity he built up one of the largest businesses in the provinces ; and was specially successful in catering for the military messes and canteens throughout the country. His picture posters were the leading features of the time, and everywhere you went your eye met "Carolan's Whiskey is the Best," "Carolan's Tea is the Best." He commenced business in 1852, and died in 1880. His surviving daughter was married to Mr. R. L. Brown, R.M., Roscommon. The business is still successfully conducted and extended by his son Mr. Paul V. Carolan. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[10] Vincent T. CARROLL was the son of Mr. Patrick James CARROLL, of Church Street, was the founder of the famous tobacco factory, still carried on and largely extended by his son Mr. Vincent S. Carroll and his sons, under the name of P. J. Carroll & Co., with extensive branches in Glasgow and elsewhere. His eldest son, Mr. James Carroll, of Lisnawilly, who at one time was a prominent merchant and politician is now a popular resident in Winnipeg, Canada. Mr. Carroll married the daughter of Mr. James Gilmore, sister to Mrs. Stephen Brown and Mrs. Connick. He died in 1879. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[11] James CONNOLLY

[12] Michael HAGARTY

[13] Joseph D. JENNINGS was the son of Mr. Patrick JENNINGS, who died in 1874, was an extensive timber and iron merchant in Francis Street, where his sons, Messrs. Patrick Coleman Jennings and Mr. Joseph D. Jennings, still successfully carry on the business under the name of P. Jennings & Co. They are extensive importers of timber and slates, and own one of the principal quays in the harbour, on which are erected roomy and convenient stores. Mr. Jennings, as well as his sons, was a member of the Harbour Board and Steam-Packet Company. He was married to the eldest daughter of Mr. Bryan Coleman, merchant, of Newry. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[14] Michael P. LYNCH. I know nothing about him, but find it interesting that the LYNCH family currently own Cavananore and were connected to Sir Thomas JACKSON. SEE: http://www.thesilverbowl.com/maps/Cavananore.htm

[15] Thomas Callan McARDLE was the son of Mr. Edward Henry Macardle, J.P., of Cambricville, founder of the celebrated and extensive Brewery of Macardle, Moore & Co. Ltd., was a man of great energy and enterprise. Good natured to a fault, he was one of the most popular men of his day, and was perpetual " Mayor " of the town till Ms death. He was also member of all the other public Boards. He married Miss Callan, daughter of Mr. Callan of Tullagee ; and his sons have achieved high positions in their several pursuits:—Thomas Callan Macardle, J.P., Fr. Andrew, S.J., John St. P., C.E., Michael J. of Kilcurley, and Peter Levins, Solicitor, and popular Golf Club Secretary. His eldest daughter is married to Mr. James Murphy, J.P., of Tullyallen, Co. Monaghan. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[16] Charles McMAHON was the son of Mr. Charles MacMahon, of Brookfield, Clerk of the Crown and Peace for the County of Louth, from the year 1869 to 1885. He was one of the leading solicitors of the County, until his official appointment necessitated his retirement from the profession. He was an eloquent advocate and sound lawyer, and enjoyed the confidence of his numerous clients. Mr. MacMahon succeeded to the office of Clerk of the Crown on the death of Mr. P. J. Byrne, in 1869; and at the retirement of Mr. Thomas Bourne in 1879 he was appointed also Clerk of the Peace. He was married to Miss Gartlan, sister of Peter M'Evoy Gartlan, and Mrs. John Gartlan. His eldest daughter was married to Mr. W. Russell, of Killough, a kinsman of Lord Russell of Killowen; and the second to the late Judge Mulholland brother-in-law to Lord Russell. His only son, Mr. Charles MacMahon, of Brookfield, succeeded him as Solicitor, and has since 1885 ably and successfully, practised his profession at his offices in Clanbrassil Street. He is married to Miss Ternan, of Drogheda, and has two children. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[17] Hugh Frank McCANN of the Dundalk Bakeries, in Church Street and Earl Street, was son of Mr. Mathew McCann. The father, a native of Drogheda, carried on business extensively at the Victoria Mills and Bakery in Park Street, and died i n the sixties ; the eldest son Matt is now doing business in Winnipeg, whilst two sons, are living in Newry, doing an extensive trade. The youngest son Joseph—an enterprising man—is now conducting the extensive trade in Church Street, where the bread is largely manufactured by patent machinery, thus obviating unnecessary handling. He can give so much employment that there is no need to go to other towns for our supply of the " staff cf life." Mr. Frank McCann died in 1906, and his widow with her son and daughter live in the Crescent. She interests herself largely in philanthropic and temperance work. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[18] Michael C. MOYNAGH

[19] James MURPHY was a son of Mr. James Murphy, Corn Merchant, Castle Street and Seafield, Blackrock, died in the year 1889, and was heavily engaged in the grain trade for many years. He was also a skilled agrriculturist, and his farm at Seafield, which he greatly enlarged from time to time, was recognised as a model one. His three sons James Murphy, J.P., of Tullyallen, Patrick J., of Blackrock, and Thomas survive him. His daughter Mary married Mr. O'Neill, J.P., of Londonderry ; and Teresa married to Mr. Philip Carney, J.P., of Cootehill. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[20] Henry O'CONNELL J.P. Merchant. He was married to a daughter of John MATTHEWS. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[21] John D. O'NEILL was a son of Mr. Matthew O'Neill, Corn Merchant and Malster, of Church Street, was one of the most extensive corn buyers of his time, and was recognised by the farmers as a " good buyer." He never sought any public position ; but was content to pursue the even tenor of his way, whilst taking an active and intelligent interest in the welfare of the town. He married Miss Dullaghan, and died in 1893. He had two sons, one who died young, and the second John D., who worthily carried on and very much extended the business of his father under the name of " M. O'Neill & Son." Mr. John O'Neill exported oats, wheat, and barley largely to England, and his trade with the Bristol Channel was most extensive. Like his father, Mr. O'Neill eschewed politics, and the only public Boards with which he became connected were the Harbour Commissioners and the Gas Company. Mr. O'Neill married the second daughter of the late Mr. Cornelius Smyth. He died in 1900. We should have liked to have been able to have given his portrait, but he had a strong aversion to the camera. John O'Neill was a staunch friend and a thorough Irish gentleman. SOURCE: Tempests Jubilee 1909.

[22] William Megaw PATTESON (d. 1912), son of Benjamin PATTESON & Mary MEGAW. He married Albert WESTON and had two children. He was J.P. of Seaton House.

[23] William TEMPEST (1835- 1918), a noted historian and publisher of the Dundalk Press, publishing articles in both Irish and English. In PRONI, he is mentioned in a will abstract: Administration of the estate of Frances Tempest late of Seatown Dundalk County Louth Spinster who died 2 May 1905 granted at Armagh to William Tempest Stationer. Effects £1,537 8s. 9d

[24] Thomas WILLIAMSON

 

 

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