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NAMES: Richard JACKSON; William JACKSON; Richard BAYLEY; Rev. Leonard JACKSON; Abigail JACKSON; William BUCKLEY; Sir Oliver CROFTON; Vigessima BOUCHE née JACKSON; Ruth JACKSON; Richard JACKSON jr.; Hellen JACKSON; Dorothy WALKER née JACKSON; Mary BRIGGS née JACKSON; Hannah BOND née JACKSON; Sir John OTWAY; Jane JACKSON née CARTER; Bryan DAWNEY aka DAWNIE; John JOHNSTON; Henry JOHNSTON; Nathaniel WATERMAN; Leonard TOWNSON; Rev. John BRIGGS aka BRIGGES. William SLATER; PLACES: Kirkby Lonsdale; Whittington; Coleraine; Biggins.
Sharon Oddie Brown. March 10, 2016

 

1679 Jan 15  Rev Richard Jackson Will

NOTE: I have not fully honoured the spelling of the day. Most of the transcription was done by using speech recognition,

with most errors dealt with (thanks also to Jan Waugh). Any remaining errors are mine.

 

NOTE: Some sources that were helpful:

·       Whittington Church Registers.

·       The Ejected of 1662 of Cumberland and Westmorland p 890-91

·       The History of the County Palatine and Duchy of Lancaster, Volume 5. Edward Baines.

·       It also helps to understand his life to realize that from 1649 to 1660, the bishops were dethroned and former practices were outlawed, and Presbyterian ecclesiology was introduced in place of the episcopate. The 39 Articles were replaced by the Westminster Confession, the Book of Common Prayer by the Directory of Public Worship. Despite this, about one quarter of English clergy refused to conform to this form of State Presbyterianism.

With the Restoration of Charles II, Parliament restored the Church of England to a form not far removed from the Elizabethan version. One difference was that the ideal of encompassing all the people of England in one religious organisation, taken for granted by the Tudors, had to be abandoned. The religious landscape of England assumed its present form, with the Anglican established church occupying the middle ground, and those Puritans and Protestants who dissented from the Anglican establishment, and Roman Catholics, too strong to be suppressed altogether, having to continue their existence outside the National Church rather than controlling it. Continuing official suspicion and legal restrictions continued well into the 19th century. SOURCE: WIKI

 

In the name of God Amen. The 15th day of January in the year of our Lord, according to the Computation of the Church of England, 1679 I, Richard Jackson[1] of Whittington in the Countie of Lancaster, Clerk and Rector of the said parish Church being of perfect memorie possessed [?] [God?] doo make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following Vizt. First, I commend and bequeath my Soul into the hands of Almighty God, my maker hoping that through the meritorious Death and passion of Jesus Christ my only Saviour and Redeemer to receive [his?] pardon and forgiveness of all my Sins. And as for my body to bee buried in Christian Burial in the chancel of the said parish Church of Whittington neare the Communion Table Vizt. on the North side of the Grave stone that Lyeth of over the place where my dear wife Dorothy Jackson was buried and under the Tomb Stone prepared already for the place of my Burial.

And as for my real and personal estate. I dispose of the same as hereafter followeth. Vizt. First I give and grant unto my Eldest Sonne, William Jackson[2] of Coleraine in the County of Derry and Kingdom of Ireland, All that my Ancient Mansion House and Shops in Kirbey [aka Kirkby] Lonsdale and Countie of Westmorland, Situate on the Westside and South end of the Market House in the said Kirkby with the Gardens, Stables and all other appurtenances thereunto belonging both the freehold Estate therein, and also of Coppie hold Estate which Coppie hold Estate is now the yearly Rent of Three shillings and Two pence payable to the Lord of the Manor at the two usual rent days by Equal portions. And I desire the same may come to him the year after my Decease and that it may so do. I charge him only with the payment of One Hundred pounds principal Debt unto Richard Bayley[3] of the Biggins[4] of the said Lordship to whom I surrendered the Coppie held Estate of the said Mansion House and Shopps for the said hundred pounds principal Debt and by Consideration for of same, but the Consideration thereof I have every year duely paid him to him to [?] mentioned in ye Coppie of ye Court Roll. And of Hundred pounds principal Some intended to have paid, but did not, in regards my Sonne Leonard Jackson[5] is content and is obliged to pay filial portions to my Three youngest Daughters and his sisters Vizt. unto Abigail[6] Vigessima[7] and Ruth Jackson[8]. And so only I charge my said Sonne William Jackson to pay the year after my Decease the said Hundred pounds principal Debt to the said Richard Bayley to [?] above-mentioned. And I give to my said Eldest Sonne William Jackson all the Tables Bedsteads, Cupboards, Wainscott, Shelves, and all the Chest that are in any part of the said Mansion House, or in any of the Shopps. And by the wise providence of God Almighty another House and Barn, and one [?] of freehold called Robinson Croft and all the Coppie hold lands situate at the South End of the said Kirkby and Extending from the said House and barn to the high way on the West And South leading onto the said Kirkby Bridge and onto the River of Loyne [aka Lune] on the East. The Coppie hold yearly rent of which House barn and Coppie hold lands is seven shillings and sixpence to be paid at Two payments at the usual rent days under the Lord of said Mannor which I formally granted, and surrendered unto [Francis] Jackson, one of my younger Sons late Rector of Warton, who dying without Issue came by Descent unto my said Sonne William Jackson, his Eldest brother. Now my Earnest Desire is that my said Sonne William would not sell away either of the Houses or Estates, but both of them preserve and reserve [suche?]. And grant unto Richard Jackson[9], one of his younger Sonnes, who was born at Whittington [?] of the large revenues God hath bestowed upon him in Ireland, which may abundantly satisfy all his other children. I am encouraged the more he will [thoroughly?] [see?] to his said Sonne Richard, and happily more. And as for my personal Estate in Goods, out of the same I give these Legacies: Vizt. Unto my said son, William Jackson my Silver signet Seal. And unto his said younger Sonne Richard one Angell[10] of gold of King Edward the Sixth his Coyne. Also I give and to my son Leonard Jackson all my Library of Bookes whatsoever as well printed Bookes and Manuscripts which are in my Study, Desiring also will keep them for his owne onely use also does not part with them to any, for they all of them precious and profitable Bookse. And I give him also the [?] with the Seaven [or Several?] boxes in it, which lieth on my Study Table, it was made in the years of our Lord 1604 as as is Engraven upon it and the Key thereof, which is upon ye Ring I keep in my pockett. Having other Keys and my Signet Seal hanging with it) . And whereas many years ago, I gave and passed on to every one of my Sonnes and Daughters which I had by my first wife, One hundred pounds apiece and upwards for their filliall porcons for which they Seal parte unto theme severall releases, yet each of them who shall bee living at ye Tyme of my Decease. I give five shillings in full for any other [Clayme?] they might make as to a Child’s portion. Also I give unto my Eldest Sonne William, a little piece of silver [?] a Romane penny of the Coyne of Tyberius Caesar. And I give unto my son Leonard Jackson a Romane penny of the Coyne of [?__spationus] Caesar. And I give unto my son Leonard one piece of gold of  Edward ye sixth his Coyne. And I give unto my dear sister Hellen[11] an Angell of gold of King Charles the first this Coyne bearing his Standard on the one side of it with this inscription for the Protestant Religion of privilege of Parliament, and the liberty of the Subject with this model in ring or edges of it Vizt.  Exurgat Deus et Dissipentur Inimici[12]. Also I give unto my dear daughter Dorothy Walker[13], a Crown pence in silver of Queen Elizabeth’s Coyne. Also I give unto her daughter Mary Waller[14] half a Crown pence of said Elizabeth’s Coyne. And also I give unto my daughter Mary Briggs[15] a Crown pence in silver of Edward the Sixth his Coyne. And unto my daughter Abigail Jackson, a Crown pence in silver of Charles the first his Coyne and unto my daughter Vigessima Jackson, a Crown pence of the King of Sweden’s Coyne. And unto my youngest daughter Ruth Jackson I give a Crown pence in silver of the city of [?onts] Coyne. Also I give unto my Daughter Hannah Bond[16] a Dutch dollar w’th ye image of ye Duke on ye one side and his wife ye Duchesse on ye other side. And what other pences in Silver either English or Outlandish Coyne greater or smaller. I give unto my executor hereafter named: And lastly I give unto Sir John Otway[17] a small pence of gold of John the Second the King of Portugal his Coyne with a cross in it[18], and this motto In Hoc Signe Vinces whom I humbly desire to bee supervisor of this my last will and Testament. And finally I do hereby ordaine make and Constitute Jane[19] [?] my dearly Loved wife Sole Executrix of this my last will and Testament unto whom I give all my Goods Credits whatsoever she requested. And all former Wills I do hereby absolutely revoke. And unto this I subscribe my hand and set to my Seal and I declare it to be my will. Witnesse this my hand and seal of day and year above written.

 

Sealed signed and delivered

in sight [?] of us

 

Bryan [Dawny][20]

John Johnston[21]

Henry Johnston[22].

 

 

Richard Jackson

[Latin text that I did not transcribe]

 

The condition of this obligation is such that if the above bound on

Jane Jackson

do well [?] [?] performed fulfil and keep the last Will and Testament of Richard Jackson, Clarke [?] Rector of Whittington Deceased doo pay or satisfy all Debts, Children’s portions, and all other legacies, according to the Tenor of the said Wills so far as the law binds: And to exhibit into court a true and [sufficient?] Inventory of all the Goods and Rights of the said deceased: And shall give the court a true and a perfect document of the promises when [Jane?] shall be legally called: And at all times shall well and sufficiently [?] defend and keep harmless and Indemnified the said Comissary, and all his officers and shall give further and better Security to the said Comissary when [ever?] shall be required: Then this obligation to be void or otherwise in force.

 

Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of                                 Jackson

                                                                                                Jane       [__]   Mark

 

Nathanial Waterman[23]

Leonard Townson[24].

 

John Briggs[25]

 

 


A True and perfect Inventorie of all and singular

the Goods Chattells and Credits of Mr Richard Jackson,

Rector of Whittington deceased prized the eighth day of

March Anno Dominus 1680 by us [?] names and

underwritten as followeth

 

£

s

d

From his purse and apparel

15

001

00

From gold and silver in his desk

05

001

00

From his library of books

40

00

00

From silver [?]

12

00

00

From Brass and pewter

08

00

00

From One [?] Two  Jxon [?] with other Jxon [?]sills

03

00

00

From Bedding and Bed [?]

50

00

00

From Table Cloths, napkins and other Linnen

12

00

00

From Tables and [?]

03

00

00

From Chairs, Stools and Cushions

03

00

00

From Cupboards

03

10

00

From [?] and Chests and [?]

06

00

00

From wooden [Dresser?]

05

10

00

From one Hand Mill

01

00

00

From Shelves and boards

00

06

00

From flax and Hemp and yarn

01

05

00

From White plate and Earthen pots

01

00

00

From Meal and Malt

04

00

00

From Books and [B?on]

02

00

00

From Butter and Cheese

01

10

00

From [Bonds?]

01

00

00

From [fluid Steers?]

10

00

00

From Two young Steers

03

00

00

From [?] [?]

14

00

00

From [?] [?]

09

00

00

From one gelding and two [Mares?]

15

00

00

From Three Colts

06

00

00

From Two Swine

01

10

00

From Hay and Corne

20

00

00

From [?] [Geare?]

03

00

00

From Manure

00

15

00

From money owing upon [Spo?]

60

00

00

Exhibit [?] Summa Total

326

06

00

Funeral Expenses

15

00

00

Bryan [Dawney?]

Henry Johnson

Will[?] Slater[26]

William [?]rker[27].

 

 



[1] Rev. Richard JACKSON (1602-1681) son of William JACKSON (1574-abt 1627) & Mary SLATER. He had two wives and 22 known children. He faced bankruptcy at one point, had to continually maneuver through the shifting sands of religious loyalties during the battles between the Royalists and the Roundheads. Charles I left the throne for the scaffold, and was replaced by Oliver Cromwell and the support of Puritanism and Presbyterianism, then in 1660, the restoration of Charles II to the throne. His daughters married wealthy men, and at least some of his sons married into wealth.

·       Jackson, Richard: mat. pen. 1619 July: B.A. 1622 (Mids.); M.A. 1626. Rector of Halton, near Lancaster, 24 Nov. 1630, again March 1634/5, and ceased 1648 : his son Francis by his first marriage (to Dorothy Otway) was admitted 1649. Rector of Whittington near Kirkby Lonsdale 15 July 1641 where he gave a sun-dial (still existing) to the village. He retained his post as minister of Whittington in the 8th Lancs. Classis 2 Oct. 1646 (Shaw 2. 397), in which year he subscribed the protest of the Lancs. presbyterian ministers against toleration of strange doctrines (Halley, 1. 473). He remained there till his death in 1680/1. He was twice married: his eldest daughter Marie, was baptised 2 Dec. 1642: between 1644 and 1646 his first wife died : and he married Jane Carter 26 Jan. 1647/8-, by whom he had four daughters and a son Leonard (admitted here 1668). His tombstone, which remains much worn, shows that he was buried 24 Feb. 1680/1. (Information from Rev. John Hodgkin.) Will proved at Richmond. (Croston-Baines, 5. 559.)  Source: Biographical Register of Christs College.

·       JACKSON, RICHARD. Matric. pens, from CHRIST'S, July, 1619; B.A. 1622; M.A. 1626. R. of Halton, Lanes., 1630-41. R. of Whittington, 1641-80. A member of the Presbyterian Classis, but conformed at the Restoration. Will (Archd. Richmond) 1680. Father of Francis (1649), Leonard (1668) and William (1644-5). (yte. Hist, of Lanes., vm. 251; E. Axon.). SOURCE: Alumni Cantabrigienses: A Biographical List of All Known Students, Graduates Cambridge Students list.

·       On Oct. 6, 1640 Richard Jackson was appointed cleric of Whittington by Edw. Middleton of Middleton after the death of Rev. Daniel Moures. Then on June 12, 1641 Richard Jackson was reappointed, this time by The King, by lapse, as a result of simony (the selling of clerical favours). SOURCE: The History of the County Palatine and Duchy of Lancaster, Volume 2. edited by William Robert Whatton, John Harland, Brooke Herford

·       First one Mr. Jackson ministr of Whittingham neare Kyrby Lonsdall, a vry pious & honest able man haveing heretofore entred bond as surety wth a popish recusant (I psume it was wth hopes to gayne him to or Church) principall for the sume of 100£, this was donne before these troubles, & the popish gentleman proveing a Delinquent all his lands & meanes beinge sequestred, is utterly disabled to satisfy that debt, whereuppon honest Mr. Jackson is like to beare the burden, but I feare it will breake his backe & the creditours (now tyme begineing to be open (?) in Lancashire where Mr. Jackson lives that suites may be tryed) doth labour to pursue Mr. Jackson & recovr his 100£ of him wch indeed is easyly done for the bond is cleere. Yet if lawe pceede agaynst Mr. Jackson & compell him to pay it as it will do, he will "be undone, and not able to subsist haveing wife & many children, 14 children he hath & the 15th (is by this tyme borne for every houre his wife lookes for it) this is this honest ministrs desire & I earnestly desire the same, that yor Lorp be pleased to advise his friend (that will repaire to yor Lorp) what course may be taken that Mr. Jackson may have satisfaction, if any be to be had out of the delinquents estate of lands or woods, or any way whereby himselfe & the publike be not priudiced, we leave it to yor Lorps wisdome, & information of any that shall be imployed to come to yor Lorp. I am sure if yor Lorp can help him you shall not neede repent of it he is so honest a ministr. SOURCE: The Ejected of 1662 in Cumberland and Westmorland : Their Predecessors and Successors, Vol 2. B. Nightingale, M.A. Manchester, 1911. Pp 890-91 A letter written Feb 28, 1645 from Henry Masy to Josiah Lambert. NOTE: The child about to be born was Roger JACKSON, and Dorothy JACKSON either died in childbirth, or shortly afterwards at about age 40.

·       A clue to some of the land holdings that he likely inherited from his father [Note: His grandmother may have been a WILKINSON. It is worth checking whether the William JACKSON (b aft 1555), son of John JACKSON (1526-1590) and Helen WILKINSON (1538-1590) is the same William JACKSON who was the father of Rev. Richard JACKSON]: Inquest taken at Kirkby Kendall, 19 September, 19 James I (1621), before Joseph BOOTHE, gentleman, escheator. Thomas WILKINSON, chapman, was seised of 2 messuages and tenements at Becksyde in Olde Hutton and 30 a. land there; a moiety of a fulling mill in Old Hutton; and a messuage and tenement at Ealingwraye in Old Hutton and 20 a. land there. By his writing dated 12 September, 12 James I (1614), made between Roger BRADLEY of Underbarrowe, chapman, of the one part and the said Thomas WILKINSON of the other part, in consideration of a marriage then to be solemnized between Giles BRADLEY, second son of the said Roger BRADLEY, and Mary, only daughter of the said Thomas WILKINSON, he granted to Roger BRADLEY that upon reasonable request he would make a conveyance to William JACKSON of Kirkby Lonsdale, mercer, Barnard GILPIN of Underbarrowe, yeoman, and James BRADLEY of Underbarrowe, clothier, and their heirs of all the aforesaid premises, to be limited to the use of the said Thomas WILKINSON and Elizabeth, then his wife, for their lives in survivorship and afterwards to the use of the said Giles BRADLEY, and his heirs begotten of the said Mary. And by another writing, in part performance of the agreement above specified, he enfeoffed William, Barnard and James of the premises; which were held of the king at the time of Thomas WILKINSON's death and are now held of Charles, prince of Wales, as of his manor of Kendall called "le Marques fee" in free socage namely by suit of court and a rent, worth yearly 20s. clear. He died 22 March 1614[-15] and Mary, now wife of Giles BRADLEY, was and is his daughter and next heir, now aged 25 years; Court of Wards Inq., p.m., vol. 64, n. 79.

·        Whittington AND ye said Jurors say upon their oathes that the parish Church of Whittington, wth in ye said Hundred of Loynsdale
[Lonsdale] and County of Lancaster, is a parsonage psen- tative with Cure of Soules, And That Thomas Came, Esqr
a papist delinquent, is reputed patron, ye same being an entire Rectory ; And that ye said pish of Whittington doth
containe within it ye sev'all Towneshipps, Hamletts, or Villages of ye severall distances from y e said parish Church
hereafter followinge, viz* Whittington, where ye Church is seated ; Newton, distant as aforesaid One mile ; Docker,
One myle and a half; And likewise That there is belonging to ye said Church Two acres of Gleabe landes or thereabouts,
and also Tythes of Corne and grayne through the whole parish, together with wooll, lamb, pigg, goose, hay, hemp,
flax, and small Tythes through ye whole parish, Except hay in Docker, for which ye Inhabitants of Docquer [Docker]
paye a pscripcon rent. And ye said Jurors further say That there is some pscripcon or Composicon Rent w th in ye said
pish onely, for hay in Docquer [Docker] as before about Twenty shillings, And that ye whole pffitts issuing out of
the whole Rectorie are comonly reputed to be worth one hundred thirtye seaven pounds ; And ye said Jurors likewise
saye That ye Minister Officiating ye Cure att ye said pish Church of Whittington is Mr Richard Jackson, Maister of Arts, a godly preaching Ministe
r. Lancashire and Cheshire Church Surveys. 1649-1655. Published by the Record Society for the Publication of Original Documents relating to Lancashire and Cheshire. Vol I. 1879.

[2] William JACKSON (1628-1688) of Coleraine. He had 9 known children, and was a wealthy landowner in Coleraine. He married twice: 1stly Elizabeth STAPLES  and 2ndly Susan Beresford (mother of his children). Both were prestigious marriages to daughters of wealthy men.

·       SEE: Timeline of JACKSONs of Coleraine.

·       SEE: Coleraine Jackson Family Tree

[3] Richard BAYLEY. I do not know who he was.

[4] Biggins is in the parish of Kirkby Lonsdale. The Carew family were predominate here.

[5] Rev. Leonard JACKSON (165-1726) Rector at Tatham, and godfather to another Leonard JACKSON.

·       Jackson, Leonard: son of Richard : born at Whittington, Lanes. School : (1) Lancaster, under M'' Holden : (2) Kirkby Lonsdale, under M"' Garthwaite for a few months. Admitted sizar under M"' [Chris.] Bainbridge [who held his Fellowship till Mids. 1669] 20 May 1668. Age 17. B.A. 1671/2; M.A. 1677. Born 21 April 1650, of Jane the second wife of Richard (matd 1619) rector of Halton, then of Whittington near Kirkby Lonsdale: half-brother of Francis (1649). Ordained deacon, Chichester, 1673 May: priest, York, 1676 May. Rector of Claughton in Lonsdale, Lanes. 5 Sept. 1678: held it till 1681, when according to Croston-Baines (5. 534) he died : but he pretty certainly is the same who resigned the vicarage of Sheriff Hutton before April 1700: and on 3 Feb. of the same year he became rector of Tatham near Wennington. Added a steeple to the church tower 1722. Died 1734: or 1726 (Croston-Baines, 5. 555) when at all events he ceased to be rector, Robert Jackson succeeding. (Information from B. N. North, Esq., Kirkby Lonsdale [aka Bordrigge North NORTH (1862-1936.)] SOURCE: Biographical Register of Christs College

·       His 1726 will would seem to indicate that he had no living children, since he left bequests to nieces, nephews, a number of cousins, and a godson Leonard JACKSON. I do not know who the father (or mother) of the nieces and nephews were. I suspect Nathaniel JACKSON was the father.

[6] Abigail JACKSON (1655-1721). Her 1st marriage was to a widower of considerable means. In her 2nd marriage, she married a man who was not only 27 years her junior, but half her age (and then she lived to be 80 years old).

·       She married firstly a William BUCKLEY Esq. in 1718, in a marriage performed by her uncle Rev. Leonard JACKSON.  SOURCE: Marriages at the Church of St James the Less in the Parish of Tatham

  • William BUCKLEY Esq. was a widower, and likely came into Wennington Hall after the death of his 1st wife, Mary, the widow of Charles MARSDEN of Wennington Hall, Lancashire. SOURCE: The History of the Parish of St. Michael’s-on-Wyre.
  • There are some impressive photos of Wennington Hall, a class II building now used as a school: Wennington School and Wiki Wennington Hall.
  • She married Sir Oliver CROFTON on December 6, 1737. He had multiple “bastard” children born while Abigail was alive, and then named Ellinore PIERCE as his wife. NOTE: It is unlikely that they actually married. SOURCE: Crofton Memoirs, An account of JOHN CROFTON, Of Ballymurry, Co. Roscommon Queen Elizabeth's Escheator-General of ASD OF His Ancestors and Descendants, and others Bearing the Name. York 1911. Compiled by Henry Thomas Crofton, assisted by Rev. William Ball Wright and Helen Augusta Crofton. NOTE: The Rev. William Ball WRIGHT who assisted in the preparation of these memoirs was also hired by Amy LLOYD née JACKSON to prove some aspects of her mother’s ancestry.
  • Sir Oliver was born in 1710, and died on November 9, 1780. On December 6, 1737, when he was 27 years old, he married, at St. Audoen's Church in Dublin, a widow, Mrs. Abigail Jackson Buckley, who was just double his age, viz., 54, and there was no issue of the marriage. She was possessed of much property in Ireland, and also in the Counties of Lancaster, York, and Westmorland, in England. Sir Oliver administered to her estate on February 4, 1767: Crofton Memoirs, An account of JOHN CROFTON, Of Ballymurry p.128
  • Pue's Occurrences record that on August 18, 1742, "at Limerick the trial began of Oliver Crofton, Esq., for the killing of John Massey, of Duntrv League, Esq., in a duel, as also of Thomas Cooke, Esq., his second. The prosecution was carried on against them both by the relatives of the deceased. The trial lasted near five hours, when, to the general satisfaction, they were honourably acquitted." NOTE: The Rev. William Ball WRIGHT who assisted in the preparation of these memoirs was also hired by Amy LLOYD née JACKSON to prove some aspects of her mother’s ancestry. Crofton Memoirs, An account of JOHN CROFTON, Of Ballymurry p.128
  • There is a Miniature of a young Crofton woman painted in a miniature at the National Gallery of Ireland. Since it does not resemble the mother of Sir Oliver CROFTON, it may be Abigail JACKSON. Crofton Memoirs, An account of JOHN CROFTON, Of Ballymurry p.128
  • The lands of Ballinclea, or the Town of the Mountain, were first mentioned in the time of the Commonwealth. They were then forfeited lands, and had belonged to the owner of Loughlinstown, James Goodman, who had mortgaged them to his cousin, Roland Goodman. The tithes were paid to the Cathedral of Christ Church, as they had, no doubt, been in mediaeval times to the Priory of the Holy Trinity. After the restoration of the lands, on which the two houses and a population of nine Irish, were granted amongst much other property, to the Duke of York, afterwards James II, and remained in his possession until his abdication. Some years after that event, in 1703, there were put up for auction by the trustees of the forfeited estates, and sold to Mr Samuel Jackson. They subsequently became the property of Sir Oliver Crofton, Bart, whose baronetcy, conferred on an ancestor after the restoration, became extinct on his death. Crofton was a rollicking blade, and did not bear the most immaculate character. In early life he had stood his trial for killing a man, one of the Massys of Duntrileague, in a duel, and his proceedings, after the death of his predecessor in the title, had not been to his credit. Attempts were made from time to time to induce people to build on the excellent sites which the lands of Ballinclea afforded, and finally Crofton came to live there himself. Loftus, whose lands adjoined, found Crofton a most unpleasant neighbour, and, on his boundary wall being thrown down by Crofton and his servants, sought, in 1765, the protection of the House of Commons. The house found that a breach of privilege and been committed, and some of Crofton’s servants, who had insulted Loftus, were taken into custody. SOURCE: A History of the County of Dublin: The People, Parishes and Antiquities from the earliest times to the close of the Eighteenth Century.  Vol 1 Francis Erlington Ball. Dublin, 1902. NOTE: This fracus happened after Abigail JACKSON’s death.
  • Deeds evidence mentions both marriages: ROD: 120-79-81900. Indentured deed btw Sir Oliver CROFTON of the City of Dublin Bart & Dame Abigail CROFTON otherwise Buckley otherwise JACKSON his wife. & Jane JACKSON of the City of Dublin spinster of the other part. Thomas COCKS of Mt Cashell in the County of Clare Gent of the other part imparting that the said Sir Oliver CROFTEN Abigail his wife, and  Jane JACKSON in pursuance of a minitt or article therein mentioned have been made theretofore made by Samuel JACKSON deceased to John BETSON deceased and in consid of the rents & agreements… demised to said Thomas COCKS the town and land of Knightstown otherwise Kingstown containing therin mentioned 121a 3r 2p in Parish of Lusk Barony of Nethercross & Co of Dublin for 31 years . NOTE:  Samuel JACKSON (1641-1706) was her uncle. Lusk is now in the Barony of Balrothery East.

[7] Vigessima JACKSON (1657-1734).

·       She was the twentieth of the more than twenty children born to Rev. Richard JACKSON– hence named Vigessima. Her mother was Jane CARTER. In spite of being the 20th child, she had two younger sisters: twins Mary & Ruth.

·       She married Rev. Thomas BOUCHE (1654-1716), and he succeeded her father as rector of Whittington. In 1695, she was executor of her mother’s will.  .

[8] Ruth JACKSON (abt1660-1687) was christened at Whittington, with her twin Mary, and the twins were likely born there. Her death date is imputed from a record of a burial at Whittington Church. Although the transcript refers to Mrs. Ruth Jackson, I suspect it should have been recorded as: “Miss Ruth Jackson”.

[9] Richard JACKSON (1673-1730), son of William JACKSON (1628-1688) & Susan Beresford (-1706).

·       He married 1stly Anne BATE (1674-1698), and had three children, with only one surviving at the time of their mother’s death. She was buried at her hometown of Ashby de la Zouche, Leicester, England.

·       He married 2ndly Elizabeth BOYD & had five children with her.

·       It is likely that he was the Ensign Richard JACKSON at the siege of Derry who was under the command of Col. John MICHELBURN (who later married his mother).

[10] SOURCE: Thanks to Jan Waugh: The English Gold Angel first made its appearance in 1470 (Henry VI) and the legend on the reverse "Per Crucem Tua Salsva Nos Christie Redemptor" suggests that may have been intended as a healing piece from the first. It also was a piece intended to depict the King as divinely elected and divinely inspired.  http://www.gold-stater.com/gold-angel-coin.html

[11] Hellen JACKSON, Rather than being a sister of Rev. Richard JACKSON, and hence a daughter of William JACKSON (1574-abt 1627) & Mary SLATER (abt 1575-), I suspect she was a sister-in-law and the wife of Rev. Richard JACKSON’s  brother John JACKSON. If my hunches are correct, then she was born Helen SEDGEWICKE, and she married John JACKSON in 1641 at Kirkby Lonsdale.

[12] Hammered Inscriptions and their Meanings. Let God arise and His enemies be scattered (The religion of the Protestants, the laws of England, the liberty of Parliament)

[13] Dorothy WALKER née JACKSON (1639-aft1688). Her husband was a merchant, Thomas WALKER of Leeds. She was not described as a widow in 1688, so I presume that her husband was still alive.

https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/16869/lot/98/

[14] Mary WALKER. Daughter of Thomas WALKER and Dorothy JACKSON (1639-aft1688).

[15] Mary BRIGGS née JACKSON (1653-Aft1695) She married Rev. John BRIGGS 24 June 24th, 1673

·       The family was rooted at Kirkby Lonsdale, and possibly others with the same surname were related: Inquest taken at Kirbie Kendall 23 September, 4 Chas. I (1628) before Henry COWPER, esq., escheator, by the oath of Anthony KNIPE, gent., Allan STEPHENSON, Henry FIELD, Christopher PHILLIPSON, Thomas BRIGGES, William HODGSON, John BIRKETT, Henry GARNETT, Adam SHEPHEARD, Miles WILLIAMSON, James HARDIE, Edmond GARNETT, Robert HARLINGE, William JENINGES, Edward HARLINGE and John JACKSON yeomen, who say that:Thomas Adlan, yeoman, on the day he died was seised of 1 messuage and 10 acres of land, meadow and pasture and common of pasture and turbary to said mess. belonging in Olde Hutton. Premises held of king as of his manor of Kirkbie Kendall called "le Marquesse fee" in free socage and are worth yearly clear 6d. He died 25 Septr, 3 Chas. 1 (1627), and Elizabeth Adlan is his daughter and nearest heir, aged 4 years 10 months now; Chanc. Inquisns post mort., ser. ii, vol. 707, n. 79. SOURCE: British History on line.

[16] Hannah BOND née JACKSON (1636-aft 1688). Her husband was a Major. No dates nor first a first name for her husband known as yet.

[17] Sir John OTWAY (1620-1693)

·       Sir John OTWAY married a Mary BIGGS (1620-1695) – she may be related to the BRIGGS family. He was the half-brother of Dorothy JACKSON née OTWAY.

·       In the 1660s Friends suffered persecution in this area as they did elsewhere; however the local Justice of the Peace, Sir John Otway of Ingmire Hall, was sympathetic to the Quaker cause and helped to secure the release of Friends from gaol.

[19] Jane JACKSON née CARTER (abt 1618-1695), the 2nd wife of Rev. Richard JACKSON. Her will was probated.

[20] Bryan DAWNEY aka DAWNIE. He was a long standing member of the Whittington church, and he and/or his father served as a church elder, SOURCE: Whittington Church Records.

[21] John JOHNSTON. He also signed the probate of Jane JACKSON, widow of Rev. Richard JACKSON.

[22] Henry JOHNSTON. He also signed the probate of Jane JACKSON, widow of Rev. Richard JACKSON.

[23] Nathaniel WATERMAN

[24] Leonard TOWNSON

[25] John BRIGGS aka BRIGGES.   This is likely Rev. John BRIGGS, the husband of Mary JACKSON (1653-aft 1695). She was a daughter of Rev. Richard JACKSON.

[26] NOTE: The mother of Rev. Richard JACKSON was a Mary SLATER. I would expect a family connection (thanks to Jan Waugh for catching this). The family name was also frequently recorded in the Whittington Church Records

[27] William [?]urker

 

 

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